BLOODROOT

BLOODROOT
BLOODROOT is not a vitamin name, but rather a plant known for its red sap. It has been used in traditional medicine for its potential antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.
Minimum Market Price: 0.1

Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Bloodroot is a plant. People use the underground stem (rhizome) to make medicine.

People sometimes use bloodroot by mouth or apply it to the skin for a long list of conditions, but there is no scientific evidence to support these uses, and using it can be unsafe.

Bloodroot contains a compound called sanguinarine, which has been found to have powerful antibacterial and antifungal properties, making it a potential natural remedy for various skin infections and conditions.

Side Effects

Bloodroot is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, short-term. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and grogginess.

Long-term use by mouth in high amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. At high doses it can cause low blood pressure, shock, coma, and an eye disease called glaucoma. Also, bloodroot is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used as a toothpaste, mouthwash, or applied to the skin. Don't let bloodroot get into your eyes because it can cause irritation. It may also cause white patches on the inside of the mouth. Skin contact with the fresh plant can cause a rash. Bloodroot can also burn and erode the skin, leaving an uneven scar.

Interactions

We currently have no information for BLOODROOT overview.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

Bloodroot is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, short-term. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and grogginess.

Long-term use by mouth in high amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. At high doses it can cause low blood pressure, shock, coma, and an eye disease called glaucoma. Also, bloodroot is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used as a toothpaste, mouthwash, or applied to the skin. Don't let bloodroot get into your eyes because it can cause irritation. It may also cause white patches on the inside of the mouth. Skin contact with the fresh plant can cause a rash. Bloodroot can also burn and erode the skin, leaving an uneven scar. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Bloodroot is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy and POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth while breast-feeding; avoid use.

Stomach or intestinal problems such as infections, Crohn's disease, or other inflammatory conditions: Bloodroot can irritate the digestive tract. Don't use it if you have any of these conditions.

An eye disease called glaucoma: Bloodroot might affect glaucoma treatment. If you have glaucoma, don't use bloodroot unless a healthcare professional recommends it and monitors your eye health.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of bloodroot depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bloodroot. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Respond: 0
Rating:
(5)
Minimum Market Price
$0.1