CAPSICUM

CAPSICUM
The vitamin found in capsicum, also known as bell peppers, is vitamin C. It is an essential nutrient that supports the immune system and acts as an antioxidant in the body.
Minimum Market Price: 0.1

Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Capsicum, also known as red pepper or chili pepper, is an herb. Its fruit is commonly applied to the skin for arthritis pain and other conditions.

The fruit of the capsicum plant contains a chemical called capsaicin. Capsaicin is what seems to help reduce pain and swelling. A particular form of capsicum causes intense eye pain and other unpleasant effects when it comes in contact with the face. This form is used in self-defense pepper sprays.

Capsicum is commonly used for nerve pain and other painful conditions. It is also used for many other purposes, including digestion problems, conditions of the heart and blood vessels, and many others, but there is no good scientific evidence for many of these uses.

Capsicum, also known as bell pepper or chili pepper, is an excellent source of vitamin C. In fact, a single green bell pepper contains more vitamin C than an orange! So next time you're looking to boost your immune system, reach for a delicious and colorful capsicum.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Capsicum is likely safe when consumed in amounts typically found in food. Capsaicin, the active chemical in capsicum, is possibly safe when used short-term. Side effects can include stomach irritation, sweating, and runny nose. Capsicum is possibly unsafe to take in large doses or for long periods of time.

When applied to the skin: Lotions and creams that contain capsicum extract are likely safe for most adults. Capsaicin is approved by the FDA as an over-the-counter medication. Side effects can include skin irritation and itching. Capsicum can also be very irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat. Don't use capsicum on sensitive skin or near the eyes.

When used in the nose: Capsicum is possibly safe. But, application in the nose can be painful and cause burning pain, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CAPSICUM

    Capsicum might slow blood clotting. Taking capsicum along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

  • Theophylline interacts with CAPSICUM

    Capsicum can increase how much theophylline the body can absorb. Taking capsicum along with theophylline might increase the effects and side effects of theophylline.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with CAPSICUM

    Capsicum might lower blood sugar levels. Taking capsicum along with diabetes medications might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

  • Aspirin interacts with CAPSICUM

    Capsicum might decrease how much aspirin the body can absorb. Taking capsicum along with aspirin might reduce the effects of aspirin.

  • ciprofloxacin (Cipro) interacts with CAPSICUM

    Minor Interaction

    Be watchful with this combination

  • Medications for high blood pressure (ACE inhibitors) interacts with CAPSICUM

    Some medications for high blood pressure might cause a cough. There is one report of someone whose cough worsened when using a cream with capsicum along with these medications for high blood pressure. But it isn't clear if this interaction is a big concern.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Capsicum is likely safe when consumed in amounts typically found in food. Capsaicin, the active chemical in capsicum, is possibly safe when used short-term. Side effects can include stomach irritation, sweating, and runny nose. Capsicum is possibly unsafe to take in large doses or for long periods of time.

When applied to the skin: Lotions and creams that contain capsicum extract are likely safe for most adults. Capsaicin is approved by the FDA as an over-the-counter medication. Side effects can include skin irritation and itching. Capsicum can also be very irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat. Don't use capsicum on sensitive skin or near the eyes.

When used in the nose: Capsicum is possibly safe. But, application in the nose can be painful and cause burning pain, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose. Pregnancy: Capsicum is likely safe when applied to the skin during pregnancy. Capsicum is possibly safe when taken by mouth as a medicine during the second half of the second trimester and during the third trimester.

Breast-feeding: If you are breast-feeding, using capsicum on your skin is likely safe. But it is possibly unsafe for your baby if you take capsicum by mouth. Skin problems (dermatitis) have been reported in breast-fed infants when mothers eat foods heavily spiced with capsicum peppers.

Children: Applying capsicum to the skin of children under two years of age is possibly unsafe. There isn't enough reliable information to know if it is safe for children to use capsicum by mouth as a medicine. Stay on the safe side and stick with the amounts found in foods.

Bleeding disorders: While conflicting results exist, capsicum might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Damaged skin: Don't use capsicum on damaged or broken skin.

High blood pressure: Taking capsicum or eating a large amount of chili peppers might cause a spike in blood pressure. In theory, this might worsen the condition for people who already have high blood pressure.

Surgery: Capsicum might increase bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using capsicum at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

In adults, capsicum has been taken by mouth as extracts, chili, fermented red pepper, red pepper powder, lozenges, nectar, and capsaicin. In both adults and children, capsicum has been applied to the skin in creams, plasters, and gels. It's also used in nasal sprays and solutions. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what type of product and dose might be best for a specific condition.

Respond: 0
Rating:
(1)
Minimum Market Price
$0.1