CASTOR BEAN

CASTOR BEAN
The Castor Bean vitamin is derived from the seeds of the castor oil plant. It is rich in essential fatty acids and antioxidants, promoting healthy skin, hair, and digestion.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Castor oil is made from the beans (seeds) of the castor plant (Ricinus communis). Its taste is initially bland, then becomes bitter and unpleasant.

Castor oil has laxative and anti-inflammatory effects. It also might induce labor. It's sometimes flavored with cinnamon, peppermint, or other flavorings to mask its unpleasant taste.

People use castor oil for constipation, dry eye, childbirth, and to empty the colon before a colonoscopy. It is also used for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

The outer coat (hull) of the castor seed contains a deadly poison called ricin. The hull must be removed before use. Ricin has been tested as a chemical warfare agent. Weapons-grade ricin is purified and produced in particles that are so small they can be breathed in.

Vitamin E, found in castor bean oil, is an antioxidant that plays a crucial role in maintaining healthy skin by protecting it from harmful UV radiation and preventing premature aging.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Castor oil is likely safe when taken as a single dose of up to 60 mL. Side effects might include stomach discomfort, cramping, nausea, and dizziness. Castor oil is possibly unsafe when taken long-term or in large doses. It might cause fluid and potassium loss.

Castor seeds that have had the outer coat removed (hulled) are possibly safe when taken as a single dose. But consuming the whole castor seed is unsafe. The hull contains a deadly poison called ricin. Chewing as few as 1-6 whole seeds can kill an adult.

When applied into the eye: Castor oil eye drops are possibly safe when used for up to 30 days.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with CASTOR BEAN

    Castor oil is a laxative. Some laxatives can cause diarrhea and decrease potassium levels. “Water pills” can also decrease potassium levels. Taking castor oil along with “water pills” might make potassium levels drop too low.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Castor oil is likely safe when taken as a single dose of up to 60 mL. Side effects might include stomach discomfort, cramping, nausea, and dizziness. Castor oil is possibly unsafe when taken long-term or in large doses. It might cause fluid and potassium loss.

Castor seeds that have had the outer coat removed (hulled) are possibly safe when taken as a single dose. But consuming the whole castor seed is unsafe. The hull contains a deadly poison called ricin. Chewing as few as 1-6 whole seeds can kill an adult.

When applied into the eye: Castor oil eye drops are possibly safe when used for up to 30 days.

Pregnancy: Castor oil is possibly safe when taken by mouth during pregnancy when at or beyond the pregnancy due date. But castor oil should not be used for this purpose without the supervision of a healthcare provider. Castor oil is likely unsafe when taken before the pregnancy due date is reached. It might bring on labor too early. Taking whole castor seeds by mouth is unsafe. There isn't enough reliable information to know if hulled castor seeds are safe or what the side effects might be. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if castor oil is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Castor oil is possibly safe when taken by mouth in appropriate doses, short-term. But castor oil is possibly unsafe when taken by mouth for more than one week or at doses greater than 1-15 mL daily, depending on age. It can cause a chemical imbalance in the body. Taking whole castor seeds by mouth is unsafe.

Intestinal problems: Don't use castor oil if you have a blocked intestine, unexplained stomach pain, or problems with your bile ducts or gall bladder.

Dosing

Castor oil has most often been used by adults as a single dose of 5-120 mL by mouth. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. It does not replace professional medical consultation, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not self-medicate based on the information presented on this site. Always consult with a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before making any decisions about your health.

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