CLAY

CLAY
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Clay is a type of fine-grained rock or soil. Some types of clay are used to make medicine.

People use clay for diarrhea and other stomach disorders, mouth sores, detoxification, and other conditions. But there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

Montmorillonite clay, a type of clay found in the region of Montmorillon in France, has been used for centuries for its medicinal qualities. It is rich in minerals like magnesium, calcium, and potassium, making it beneficial for skin detoxification, promoting healthy digestion, and aiding in wound healing.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Clay is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for a short period of time. It has been safely used in doses up to 3 grams daily for 3 months or 4 grams daily for 6 weeks. Side effects are usually mild but may include constipation, vomiting, or diarrhea. Clay is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth for a long period of time. Eating clay long-term can cause low levels of potassium and iron. It might also cause lead poisoning, muscle weakness, intestinal blockage, skin sores, or breathing problems.

When applied to the skin: Clay is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin inside the mouth. A clay called dioctahedral smectite 12 grams daily has been used safely in the mouth as a cream for 5 days.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Cimetidine (Tagamet) interacts with CLAY

    Clay might lower the absorption of cimetidine (Tagamet). This might decrease the effects of cimetidine.

  • Quinine interacts with CLAY

    Taking clay along with quinine might reduce the amount of quinine the body absorbs. This might decrease the effects of quinine.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Clay is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for a short period of time. It has been safely used in doses up to 3 grams daily for 3 months or 4 grams daily for 6 weeks. Side effects are usually mild but may include constipation, vomiting, or diarrhea. Clay is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth for a long period of time. Eating clay long-term can cause low levels of potassium and iron. It might also cause lead poisoning, muscle weakness, intestinal blockage, skin sores, or breathing problems.

When applied to the skin: Clay is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin inside the mouth. A clay called dioctahedral smectite 12 grams daily has been used safely in the mouth as a cream for 5 days. Pregnancy: Clay is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for pregnant women when taken by mouth for a long time. Taking clay by mouth while pregnant might increase the risk of high blood pressure or swelling. There isn't enough reliable information to know if clay is safe to use short-term when pregnant.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if clay is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Clay is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth, short-term. A type of clay called calcium montmorillonite seems to be safe for children ages 3-9 years when taken in doses up to 1.5 grams daily for 2 weeks. Another type of clay called dioctahedral smectite seems to be safe when taken for up to 6 days in doses of 6 grams daily by infants up to 12 months old and 12 grams daily by children 12 months and older.

Anemia: Clay might interfere with iron absorption and worsen this condition.

Low potassium levels (hypokalemia): Clay might lower potassium levels and make this condition worse.

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

CHILDREN

BY MOUTH:

  • For diarrhea caused by a rotavirus: Clay has been given to infants and children daily for up to 6 days or until recovery. The most common doses used are 1.5 grams for infants up to 12 months old and 3 grams for infants 12 months and older. Doses are given up to four times daily.
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