COLTSFOOT

COLTSFOOT
Coltsfoot is a plant used in traditional medicine. It contains various vitamins and minerals that may provide health benefits, such as supporting respiratory health and reducing inflammation.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Coltsfoot is a plant. It is native to Europe and parts of Asia. It has been introduced to North America. The leaf, flower, and root are used to make medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, coltsfoot is used for asthma, cough, sore throat, swelling of the airways, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Coltsfoot is a plant rich in vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, which plays a pivotal role in the production of collagen- a protein responsible for maintaining skin elasticity and preventing wrinkles. A single serving of coltsfoot can fulfill over 90% of your daily vitamin C needs, aiding in healthier, youthful-looking skin.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Coltsfoot is considered LIKELY UNSAFE. It contains chemicals called hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These chemicals can damage the liver and lungs. Dietary supplement products sold in the US are not required to state the amount of PAs they may contain. So, if the package doesn't say the product is certified hepatotoxic PA-free, you can assume that there are probably hepatotoxic PAs in it. Avoid using coltsfoot products that are not certified and labeled as hepatotoxic PA-free.

When inhaled: There isn't enough reliable information to know if coltsfoot is safe when inhaled or what the side effects might be.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications for high blood pressure (Antihypertensive drugs) interacts with COLTSFOOT

    Excessive doses of coltsfoot seem to increase blood pressure. By increasing blood pressure coltsfoot might decrease the effectiveness of medications for high blood pressure.

    Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDiuril), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.

  • Medications that increase break down of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inducers) interacts with COLTSFOOT

    Coltsfoot is broken down by the liver. Some chemicals that form when the liver breaks down coltsfoot can be harmful. Medications that cause the liver to break down coltsfoot might increase the toxic effects of chemicals contained in coltsfoot.

    Some of these medicines include carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin, rifabutin (Mycobutin), and others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with COLTSFOOT

    Coltsfoot might slow blood clotting. Taking coltsfoot along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Coltsfoot is considered LIKELY UNSAFE. It contains chemicals called hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These chemicals can damage the liver and lungs. Dietary supplement products sold in the US are not required to state the amount of PAs they may contain. So, if the package doesn't say the product is certified hepatotoxic PA-free, you can assume that there are probably hepatotoxic PAs in it. Avoid using coltsfoot products that are not certified and labeled as hepatotoxic PA-free.

When inhaled: There isn't enough reliable information to know if coltsfoot is safe when inhaled or what the side effects might be. Coltsfoot is considered LIKELY UNSAFE for anyone, but people with the following conditions should be especially careful about avoiding this plant:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Coltsfoot preparations are LIKELY UNSAFE for use during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Coltsfoot contains chemicals called hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These chemicals might cause birth defects and liver or lung damage. Even if the product is certified hepatotoxic PA-free, it's best to avoid use.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Coltsfoot may cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to the Asteraceae/Compositae plant family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking coltsfoot.

High blood pressure, heart disease: There is a concern that coltsfoot taken in large amounts might interfere with treatment for these conditions. Don't use coltsfoot if you have these conditions.

Liver disease: There is a concern that hepatotoxic PAs might make liver disease worse. Don't use coltsfoot if you have this condition.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of coltsfoot depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for coltsfoot. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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