COMFREY

COMFREY
Comfrey is a vitamin-rich herb known for its healing properties. It contains high levels of vitamins A, C, and B12, which support skin health and aid in tissue repair and growth. This herb also provides essential minerals like calcium, potassium, and phosphorus.
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Uses & Effectiveness

We currently have no information for COMFREY overview.

Overview

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) is a plant with yellow or purple flowers found in Europe, Asia, and North America. It contains chemicals that are poisonous.

Comfrey contains chemicals called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which can cause severe liver damage. It also contains chemicals that might reduce swelling.

Despite safety concerns, some people use comfrey for bruises, osteoarthritis, sprains, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

The US FDA has recommended that all comfrey products that are taken by mouth be removed from the market due to serious safety concerns. Don't confuse comfrey with black root or bugle. These are not the same. Also don't confuse it with foxglove, which looks similar to comfrey before it blooms.

Potassium is an essential mineral for maintaining a healthy heart, regulating blood pressure, and supporting muscle function.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Comfrey is likely unsafe. It contains chemicals called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which can cause liver damage, lung damage, and cancer. The FDA has recommended that all comfrey products that are taken by mouth be removed from the market.

When applied to the skin: Comfrey is possibly safe when used on unbroken skin in small amounts for less than 6 weeks. But the poisonous chemicals in comfrey can pass through the skin, so it is possibly unsafe to use comfrey on broken skin or to apply large amounts for more than 6 weeks.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with COMFREY

    Comfrey might harm the liver. Some medications can also harm the liver. Taking comfrey along with a medication that can harm the liver might increase the risk of liver damage.

  • Medications that increase break down of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inducers) interacts with COMFREY

    Comfrey is changed and broken down by the liver. Some drugs increase how quickly the liver changes and breaks down comfrey. This could change the effects and side effects of comfrey.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Comfrey is likely unsafe. It contains chemicals called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which can cause liver damage, lung damage, and cancer. The FDA has recommended that all comfrey products that are taken by mouth be removed from the market.

When applied to the skin: Comfrey is possibly safe when used on unbroken skin in small amounts for less than 6 weeks. But the poisonous chemicals in comfrey can pass through the skin, so it is possibly unsafe to use comfrey on broken skin or to apply large amounts for more than 6 weeks.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Comfrey is likely unsafe when taken by mouth or applied to the skin while pregnant or breast-feeding. The PAs in comfrey are absorbed through the skin and might cause birth defects. Avoid use.

Broken or damaged skin: Don't apply comfrey to broken or damaged skin. Doing so might expose you to large amounts of the chemicals in comfrey that can cause liver damage and other serious health effects.

Liver disease: Comfrey might make liver disease worse. Don't use comfrey if you have any liver problems.

Dosing

Comfrey contains chemicals that cause serious liver damage when taken by mouth. The FDA has recommended that all comfrey products that are taken by mouth be removed from the market.

Topical creams containing comfrey root extract have most often been applied to the skin by adults for up to 3 weeks. Don't apply comfrey products to broken skin or use large amounts on the skin, long-term. The poisonous chemicals in comfrey can be absorbed through the skin. Speak to a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

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