GAMBOGE

GAMBOGE
GAMBOGE is a yellow pigment derived from Garcinia gambogia, used as a food additive and in traditional medicine for gastrointestinal ailments.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Gamboge is a gum-like substance (resin) from the trunk of the Garcinia hanburyi tree. Don't confuse gamboge with garcinia (Garcinia cambogia).

Gamboge is used for cancer, constipation, infections of the intestines by parasites, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. Using gamboge can also be unsafe.

Some gamboge products are “stretched” by adding rice and wheat starches, sand, and vegetable fragments. You can spot these adulterated products because they are usually coarser and harder than pure gamboge.

GAMBOGE is a yellow resin derived from the Garcinia indica tree, commonly used in traditional medicines and as a natural dye in Southeast Asia, but it does not contain any significant vitamins.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Gamboge is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It can cause stomach pain and vomiting. Large amounts are poisonous and may cause death.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with GAMBOGE

    Gamboge is a type of laxative called a stimulant laxative. Stimulant laxatives can decrease potassium levels in the body. Low potassium levels can increase the risk of side effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).

  • Medications for inflammation (Corticosteroids) interacts with GAMBOGE

    Some medications for inflammation can decrease potassium in the body. Gamboge is a type of laxative that might also decrease potassium in the body. Taking gamboge along with some medications for inflammation might decrease potassium in the body too much.

    Some medications for inflammation include dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone), and others.

  • Stimulant laxatives interacts with GAMBOGE

    Gamboge is a type of laxative called a stimulant laxative. Stimulant laxatives speed up the bowels. Taking gamboge along with other stimulant laxatives could speed up the bowels too much and cause dehydration and low minerals in the body.

    Some stimulant laxatives include bisacodyl (Correctol, Dulcolax), cascara, castor oil (Purge), senna (Senokot), and others.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with GAMBOGE

    Gamboge can work as a laxative. In some people gamboge can cause diarrhea. Diarrhea can increase the effects of warfarin and increase the risk of bleeding. If you take warfarin do not to take excessive amounts of gamboge.

  • Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with GAMBOGE

    Gamboge is a laxative. Some laxatives can decrease potassium in the body. “Water pills” can also decrease potassium in the body. Taking gamboge along with “water pills” might decrease potassium in the body too much.

    Some “water pills” that can decrease potassium include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Microzide), and others.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Gamboge is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It can cause stomach pain and vomiting. Large amounts are poisonous and may cause death. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use gamboge if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It contains chemicals that may cause harmful side effects or death.

Heart conditions: Since gamboge is a stimulant laxative, it might cause the body to lose too much potassium. This can cause heart damage or make existing heart disease worse.

Digestive tract conditions including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, appendicitis, stomach pain, ulcers, obstruction, nausea, or vomiting: Gamboge is a stimulant laxative. It might make these conditions worse.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of gamboge depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for gamboge. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. It does not replace professional medical consultation, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not self-medicate based on the information presented on this site. Always consult with a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before making any decisions about your health.

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