GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID (GLA)

GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID (GLA)
Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid found in plant oils. It may have anti-inflammatory properties and can potentially improve conditions like arthritis and eczema.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid. It's found in various plant seed oils such as borage oil and evening primrose oil.

Omega-6 fatty acids such as GLA are found everywhere in the body. They help with the function of all cells. The body converts GLA to substances that have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects.

People use GLA for eczema, asthma, arthritis, high blood pressure, nerve pain related to diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

Don't confuse GLA with black currant, borage, or evening primrose oil. These seeds contain GLA but are not the same. Also don't confuse GLA with other omega-6 fatty acids or other sources of omega-6 fatty acids such as flaxseed oil.

Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid that has been found to exhibit potential anti-inflammatory properties. Studies suggest it may help in managing conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and atopic dermatitis, making it a promising option for natural treatment approaches.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: GLA is possibly safe when used in doses of up to 2.8 grams daily for up to one year. It can cause side effects such as soft stools, diarrhea, belching, and gas.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID (GLA)

    GLA might slow blood clotting. Taking GLA along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: GLA is possibly safe when used in doses of up to 2.8 grams daily for up to one year. It can cause side effects such as soft stools, diarrhea, belching, and gas.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if GLA is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: GLA might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: GLA might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking GLA at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

GLA has most often been used by adults in doses of 320-480 mg by mouth daily for up to one year. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. It does not replace professional medical consultation, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not self-medicate based on the information presented on this site. Always consult with a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before making any decisions about your health.

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