INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

INDIAN GOOSEBERRY
Indian Gooseberry refers to a vitamin-rich fruit commonly known as Amla. It is packed with antioxidants, nutrients, and vitamin C, known to boost immunity, improve digestion, and promote healthy hair and skin.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Indian gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica) is a tree native to India and the Middle East. It's been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years.

Indian gooseberry seems to work by reducing total cholesterol levels, including the fatty acids called triglycerides, without affecting levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol.

People commonly use Indian gooseberry for abnormal cholesterol levels and persistent heartburn. It's also used for diarrhea, osteoarthritis, and cancer, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Indian gooseberry, also known as amla, is a powerhouse of Vitamin C, containing up to 20 times more than an orange. This vitamin helps boost collagen production, improve immunity, and even aids in digestion. Adding amla to your diet can enhance hair and skin health, while also promoting overall well-being.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Indian gooseberry is commonly consumed in food. It is possibly safe when used as medicine at doses of up to 1,000 mg daily for up to 6 months, 1,500 mg daily for up to 2 months, and 2,000 mg daily for up to 1 month. It is unclear if these doses are safe to take for longer periods of time.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if Indian gooseberry is safe or what the side effects might be.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

    Indian gooseberry might slow blood clotting. Taking Indian gooseberry along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

    Indian gooseberry might lower blood sugar levels. Taking Indian gooseberry along with diabetes medications might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

  • Aspirin interacts with INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

    Aspirin can slow blood clotting. Indian gooseberry might also slow blood clotting. Taking Indian gooseberry along with aspirin might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

  • Clopidogrel (Plavix) interacts with INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

    Clopidogrel can slow blood clotting. Indian gooseberry might also slow blood clotting. Taking Indian gooseberry along with clopidogrel might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Indian gooseberry is commonly consumed in food. It is possibly safe when used as medicine at doses of up to 1,000 mg daily for up to 6 months, 1,500 mg daily for up to 2 months, and 2,000 mg daily for up to 1 month. It is unclear if these doses are safe to take for longer periods of time.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if Indian gooseberry is safe or what the side effects might be. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if Indian gooseberry is safe to use as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Bleeding disorders: Indian gooseberry might increase the risk of bleeding or bruising in some people. If you have a bleeding disorder, use Indian gooseberry with caution.

Surgery: Indian gooseberry might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking Indian gooseberry at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

Indian gooseberry fruit extract has most often been used by adults in doses of 500-1000 mg by mouth daily for 4-12 weeks. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

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