JAPANESE PERSIMMON

JAPANESE PERSIMMON
Vitamin A: Essential for healthy vision, immune function, and cell growth. Found in abundance in Japanese persimmons, this fruit can contribute to overall well-being and vibrant skin.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Japanese persimmon is a tree. People eat the fruit. The fruit and leaf are used for medicine.

Japanese persimmon is used for high blood pressure, fluid retention, constipation, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support many of these uses.

Persimmons, native to Japan, are an excellent source of Vitamin A. A single Japanese persimmon can provide up to 80% of the recommended daily intake of Vitamin A, which plays a vital role in maintaining healthy vision and supporting the immune system.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Japanese persimmon is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken as a medicine. It has been used in clinical research without reported adverse effects. The fruit might cause allergic reactions in some people, but this is uncommon. Eating the fruit in very large amounts might cause blockage of the intestines.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications for high blood pressure (Antihypertensive drugs) interacts with JAPANESE PERSIMMON

    Japanese persimmon seems to decrease blood pressure. Taking Japanese persimmon along with medications for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.

    Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDiuril), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with JAPANESE PERSIMMON

    Japanese persimmon might slow blood clotting. Taking Japanese persimmon along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, indomethacin (Indocin), ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Japanese persimmon is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken as a medicine. It has been used in clinical research without reported adverse effects. The fruit might cause allergic reactions in some people, but this is uncommon. Eating the fruit in very large amounts might cause blockage of the intestines. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of Japanese persimmon during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Taking Japanese persimmon might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Low blood pressure: Japanese persimmon might lower blood pressure. There is some concern that it might make low blood pressure worse or interfere with treatment intended to raise low blood pressure.

Surgery: Japanese persimmon might lower blood pressure or slow blood clotting. This might interfere with blood pressure control or increase the chance of excessive bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using Japanese persimmon at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of Japanese persimmon depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Japanese persimmon. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Minimum Market Price
$0.1