MAGNOLIA

MAGNOLIA
Vitamin name: Magnolia Description: Magnolia is not actually a vitamin but a plant extract with potential health benefits, including reducing stress, improving sleep, and supporting overall wellbeing.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Magnolia (Magnolia biondii) is a plant found in parts of Asia and North and South America. The bark and flowers are used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Magnolia seems to have anxiety-reducing effects. Chemicals in magnolia might kill bacteria in the mouth which might help prevent cavities or reduce gum swelling.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, magnolia is used to treat the “stagnation of qi” as well as for depression and anxiety. People also use magnolia for obesity, stress, gingivitis, plaque, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

Magnolia bark extract, also known as magnolol and honokiol, contains powerful antioxidants and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries to promote relaxation and reduce stress. It is believed to have anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it an interesting natural remedy for anxiety and depression.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Magnolia extract is possibly safe for most people when used for up to 6 weeks.

When used in toothpaste: Magnolia is possibly safe for most people when used for up to 6 months.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if magnolia is safe. Some people may develop skin rashes when magnolia is applied to the skin.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with MAGNOLIA

    Magnolia might cause sleepiness and slowed breathing. Some medications, called sedatives, can also cause sleepiness and slowed breathing. Taking magnolia with sedative medications might cause breathing problems and/or too much sleepiness.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with MAGNOLIA

    Magnolia might slow blood clotting. Taking magnolia along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Magnolia extract is possibly safe for most people when used for up to 6 weeks.

When used in toothpaste: Magnolia is possibly safe for most people when used for up to 6 months.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if magnolia is safe. Some people may develop skin rashes when magnolia is applied to the skin. Pregnancy: Taking magnolia flower bud by mouth is unsafe during pregnancy. Magnolia might cause the uterus to contract, which could cause a miscarriage. There isn't enough reliable information to know if magnolia bark is safe to use during pregnancy. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if magnolia is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: There's a concern that magnolia might slow down the nervous system too much when combined with anesthesia and other medications used during and after surgery. Magnolia might also slow blood clotting and cause bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using magnolia at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

Magnolia is used in toothpastes, chewing gum, and dietary supplements. There isn't enough reliable information to know what an appropriate dose of magnolia might be. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult a healthcare professional before using.

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