MYRTLE

MYRTLE
Myrtle is a fictional character and does not appear to have a specific vitamin associated with her name.
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Uses & Effectiveness

We currently have no information for MYRTLE overview.

Overview

Myrtle (Myrtus communis) is a shrub commonly found in Iran. The fruit, leaves, and branches are used in traditional Persian medicine.

Myrtle contains chemicals that might help fight against fungus and bacteria, and reduce swelling.

People use myrtle for acne, canker sores, abnormally heavy bleeding during menstrual periods, persistent heartburn, warts, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Don't confuse myrtle with periwinkle, which is sometimes called myrtle. These are not the same.

Vitamin K, found abundantly in green leafy vegetables and essential for blood clotting, gets its name from the German word koagulation, highlighting its role in the coagulation process.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Myrtle berry is possibly safe when used short-term. But undiluted myrtle leaf oil is likely unsafe. Myrtle leaf contains a chemical that can cause serious breathing problems and other side effects. There isn't enough reliable information available to know if myrtle leaf, myrtle branch, or myrtle berry extract are safe or what the side effects might be.

When applied to the skin: Diluted myrtle leaf extract is possibly safe. Side effects might include skin irritation and dryness.

When applied to the vagina: Diluted myrtle leaf extract is possibly safe when used in vaginal suppositories, short-term.

Interactions

We currently have no information for MYRTLE overview.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Myrtle berry is possibly safe when used short-term. But undiluted myrtle leaf oil is likely unsafe. Myrtle leaf contains a chemical that can cause serious breathing problems and other side effects. There isn't enough reliable information available to know if myrtle leaf, myrtle branch, or myrtle berry extract are safe or what the side effects might be.

When applied to the skin: Diluted myrtle leaf extract is possibly safe. Side effects might include skin irritation and dryness.

When applied to the vagina: Diluted myrtle leaf extract is possibly safe when used in vaginal suppositories, short-term.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Myrtle is likely unsafe when taken by mouth while pregnant or breast-feeding. Avoid use.

Children: Myrtle leaf oil is likely unsafe when taken by mouth in children. Even slight facial contact with the oil can cause breathing problems and death in infants and small children. There isn't enough information available to know if other forms of myrtle are safe to take by mouth or apply to the skin in children.

Dosing

There isn't enough reliable information to know what an appropriate dose of myrtle might be. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult a healthcare professional before using.

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