OATS

OATS
Oats are a nutritious cereal grain rich in vitamins like thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), and pantothenic acid (B5), supporting energy production, metabolism, and skin health.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Oat (Avena sativa) is a type of cereal grain. People often eat the plant's whole seeds (oats), outer seed layers (oat bran), and leaves and stems (oat straw).

Oats might reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and help control appetite by making you feel full. Oat bran might work by keeping the gut from absorbing substances that can lead to heart disease, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Oats seem to reduce swelling when applied to the skin.

Oat bran and whole oats are used for heart disease, high cholesterol, and diabetes. They are also used for high blood pressure, cancer, dry skin, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

OATS are rich in vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, which helps convert carbohydrates into energy and supports proper functioning of the heart, muscles, and nervous system.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Oat bran and whole oats are likely safe for most people when eaten in foods. Oats can cause gas and bloating. To minimize side effects, start with a low dose and increase slowly to the desired amount. Your body will get used to oat bran and the side effects will likely go away.

When applied to the skin: Lotion containing oat extract is possibly safe to use on the skin. Putting oat-containing products on the skin can cause some people to have a rash.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Insulin interacts with OATS

    Oats might reduce the amount of insulin needed for blood sugar control. Taking oats along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of insulin might need to be changed.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with OATS

    Oats might lower blood sugar levels. Taking oats along with diabetes medications might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Oat bran and whole oats are likely safe for most people when eaten in foods. Oats can cause gas and bloating. To minimize side effects, start with a low dose and increase slowly to the desired amount. Your body will get used to oat bran and the side effects will likely go away.

When applied to the skin: Lotion containing oat extract is possibly safe to use on the skin. Putting oat-containing products on the skin can cause some people to have a rash. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Oat bran and whole oats are likely safe when eaten in foods during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Celiac disease: People with celiac disease must not eat gluten. Many people with celiac disease are told to avoid eating oats because they might be contaminated with wheat, rye, or barley, which contain gluten. But in people who haven't had any symptoms for at least 6 months, eating moderate amounts of pure, non-contaminated oats seems to be safe.

Disorders of the digestive tract including the esophagus, stomach, and intestines: Avoid eating oat products. Digestive problems that could extend the length of time it takes for your food to be digested could allow oats to block your intestine.

Dosing

Oats are commonly eaten in foods. For health benefits, adults should eat whole oats providing at least 3.6 grams of soluble fiber daily. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. It does not replace professional medical consultation, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not self-medicate based on the information presented on this site. Always consult with a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before making any decisions about your health.

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