SPINACH

SPINACH
Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health. It is found in spinach and helps maintain strong bones and prevent excessive bleeding.
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Uses & Effectiveness

We currently have no information for SPINACH overview.

Overview

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a green, leafy plant that's available in many different varieties. It's rich in nutrients and commonly eaten as food.

Spinach contains high levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, magnesium, nitrates, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-carotene, and folic acid.

People use spinach for obesity, memory and thinking skills, muscle strength, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Spinach is an excellent source of folate, a B-vitamin that is crucial for healthy development of the brain and spinal cord in unborn babies. Pregnant women should include spinach in their diet to support their baby's neural tube formation and prevent birth defects.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Spinach is commonly consumed in foods. It is possibly safe when used in larger amounts as medicine.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with SPINACH

    Spinach contains large amounts of vitamin K. Vitamin K is used by the body to help blood clot. Warfarin is used to slow blood clotting. By helping the blood clot, spinach might decrease the effects of warfarin. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin might need to be changed.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Spinach is commonly consumed in foods. It is possibly safe when used in larger amounts as medicine. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Spinach is commonly consumed in foods. There isn't enough reliable information to know if spinach is safe to use in larger amounts as medicine while pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Children: Eating spinach as a food is likely safe for children who are more than 4 months old. But spinach is likely unsafe for infants younger than 4 months old. The nitrates in spinach can sometimes cause a blood disorder (methemoglobinemia) in young infants.

Allergies: People who are sensitive to latex or certain molds are more likely to have allergic responses to spinach. Also, people who are allergic to foods like chard and beets are more likely to have allergic responses to spinach.

Kidney disorders: Spinach might cause hard crystals to form in the kidneys. These crystals won't dissolve and might make kidney disorders worse.

Dosing

Spinach is commonly consumed as food. As medicine, there isn't enough reliable information to know what an appropriate dose of spinach might be. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult a healthcare professional before using.

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