THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1)

THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1)
Thiamine, also known as Vitamin B1, is an essential nutrient for converting food into energy and maintaining a healthy nervous system. It is crucial for the proper functioning of the brain, muscles, and cardiovascular system.
Minimum Market Price: 0.1

Uses & Effectiveness

Effective for

  • Thiamine deficiency. Taking thiamine by mouth helps prevent and treat thiamine deficiency.
  • A brain disorder caused by low levels of thiamine (Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome). Taking thiamine by IV helps decrease the risk and symptoms of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), which is related to low levels of thiamine. It is often seen in people with alcohol use disorder. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.

Overview

Thiamine (vitamin B1) is found in many foods and is used to treat low thiamine, beriberi, certain nerve diseases, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS).

Thiamine is required by our bodies to properly use carbohydrates. It also helps maintain proper nerve function. It's found in foods such as yeast, cereal grains, beans, nuts, and meat. It's often used in combination with other B vitamins, and is found in many vitamin B complex products.

People take thiamine for conditions related to low levels of thiamine, including beriberi and inflammation of the nerves (neuritis). It's also used for digestive problems, diabetic nerve pain, heart disease, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, plays a crucial role in converting food into energy and supporting proper functioning of the heart, brain, and nervous system. Interestingly, it was the first vitamin to be discovered and isolated in 1897 by researchers studying a disease called beriberi, prevalent in regions where polished rice was a staple food.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Thiamine is commonly consumed in the diet and is likely safe when taken in appropriate amounts.

Interactions

We currently have no information for THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1) overview.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Thiamine is commonly consumed in the diet and is likely safe when taken in appropriate amounts. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Thiamine is likely safe when taken by mouth as part of the diet. There isn't enough reliable information to know if higher doses are safe to use when pregnant and breast-feeding.

Children: Thiamine is likely safe when taken by mouth as part of the diet. There isn't enough reliable information to know if higher doses are safe or what the side effects might be.

Alcohol use disorder: People with alcohol use disorder often have low levels of thiamine and might need thiamine supplements. Nerve pain from alcohol use disorder can be worsened when thiamine levels are low.

Hemodialysis: People undergoing hemodialysis treatments might have low levels of thiamine and might need thiamine supplements.

Liver disease: People with chronic liver disease often have low levels of thiamine and might need thiamine supplements.

Dosing

Thiamine is an important nutrient. It's found in many foods, including cereal grains, beans, nuts, and meat.

The amount that should be consumed on a daily basis is called the recommended dietary allowance (RDA). For adult males, the RDA is 1.2 mg daily. For adult females 18 years of age, the RDA is 1 mg daily. For adult females 19 years and older, the RDA is 1.1 mg daily. The RDA during pregnancy and breastfeeding is 1.4 mg daily. Recommended amounts for children depend on age. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Respond: 0
Rating:
(5)
Minimum Market Price
$0.1