VITAMIN K

VITAMIN K
Vitamin K is crucial for blood clotting and bone health. Found in leafy greens, it aids in the production of proteins that regulate these processes.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Effective for

  • Bleeding problems in newborns with low levels of vitamin K (hemorrhagic disease). Giving newborns vitamin K1 by mouth or as a shot into the muscle helps prevent bleeding. Shots seem to work the best, but can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • Low levels of the blood clotting protein prothrombin (hypoprothrombinemia). Taking vitamin K1 by mouth or by IV can prevent and treat bleeding problems in people with low levels of prothrombin. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • A rare, inherited bleeding disorder (vitamin K-dependent clotting factors deficiency or VKCFD). Taking vitamin K by mouth or by IV can help prevent bleeding in people with VKCFD. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • Reversing the blood thinning effects of warfarin. Taking vitamin K1 by mouth or by IV can reverse the effects of warfarin, a blood thinner. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.

Overview

Vitamin K is a group of vitamins found in some green vegetables. Vitamins K1 (phytonadione) and K2 (menaquinone) are commonly available as supplements.

Vitamin K is an essential vitamin needed by the body for blood clotting, bone building, and other important processes. It's found in leafy green vegetables, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. The name vitamin K comes from the German word “Koagulationsvitamin.”

People commonly use vitamin K for blood clotting problems or for reversing the blood thinning effects of warfarin. It is also used for osteoporosis, athletic performance, breast cancer, diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these other uses.

Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting, but it also plays a vital role in bone health by activating proteins that help bind calcium, ensuring it is used in the right places in the body.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: The two forms of vitamin K (vitamin K1 and vitamin K2) are likely safe when taken appropriately. Vitamin K1 10 mg daily and vitamin K2 45 mg daily have been safely used for up to 2 years. It's usually well-tolerated, but some people may have an upset stomach or diarrhea.

When applied to the skin: Vitamin K1 is possibly safe for most people when applied as a cream that contains 0.1% vitamin K1.

Interactions

    Major Interaction

    Do not take this combination

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with VITAMIN K

    Vitamin K is used by the body to help the blood clot. Warfarin is used to slow blood clotting. By helping the blood clot, vitamin K might decrease the effects of warfarin. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin might need to be changed.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: The two forms of vitamin K (vitamin K1 and vitamin K2) are likely safe when taken appropriately. Vitamin K1 10 mg daily and vitamin K2 45 mg daily have been safely used for up to 2 years. It's usually well-tolerated, but some people may have an upset stomach or diarrhea.

When applied to the skin: Vitamin K1 is possibly safe for most people when applied as a cream that contains 0.1% vitamin K1. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Vitamin K is likely safe when taken in recommended amounts of 90 mcg daily for those over 19 years old. Don't use higher amounts without the advice of a healthcare professional.

Children: Vitamin K1 is likely safe when taken by mouth appropriately.

Kidney disease: Too much vitamin K can be harmful if you are receiving dialysis treatments due to kidney disease.

Liver disease: Vitamin K is not effective for treating clotting problems caused by severe liver disease. In fact, high doses of vitamin K can make clotting problems worse in these people.

Reduced bile secretion: People with decreased bile secretion might not absorb vitamin K supplements very well. People with this condition might need to take supplemental bile salts along with vitamin K to improve absorption.

Dosing

Vitamin K is an essential vitamin. It is found in leafy green vegetables, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

It's recommended that males over 19 years old consume 120 mcg daily, and females over 19 years old consume 90 mcg daily. While pregnant and breast-feeding, 90 mcg should be consumed daily. Recommended amounts for children depend on age. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. It does not replace professional medical consultation, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not self-medicate based on the information presented on this site. Always consult with a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before making any decisions about your health.

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