WATERCRESS

WATERCRESS
Watercress is a type of leafy green vegetable that is packed with essential vitamins and minerals. It is high in vitamin K, which plays a crucial role in blood clotting and bone health.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Watercress is a plant. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

Watercress is used for short-term swelling (inflammation) of the airways in the lungs (acute bronchitis), flu, arthritis, baldness, constipation, sexual arousal, and many other conditions, but there's no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

In foods, watercress is widely used in leaf salads and as a culinary spice.

Watercress is an excellent source of vitamin C, containing more of this vitamin than an orange. Just one cup of watercress provides over 100% of the recommended daily intake, boosting immunity and promoting healthy skin and collagen production.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Watercress is LIKELY SAFE in the amounts found in food. Watercress is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts used in medicine, short-term. When it is used long-term or in very large amounts, watercress is POSSIBLY UNSAFE and can cause damage to the stomach.

Interactions

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Chlorzoxazone (Parafon Forte, Paraflex) interacts with WATERCRESS

    The body breaks down chlorzoxazone to get rid of it. Watercress might decrease how quickly the body breaks down chlorzoxazone. Taking watercress along with chlorzoxazone might increase the effects and side effects of chlorzoxazone.

  • Lithium interacts with WATERCRESS

    Watercress might have an effect like a water pill or “diuretic.” Taking watercress might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with WATERCRESS

    Watercress contains large amounts of vitamin K. Vitamin K is used by the body to help blood clot. Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. By helping the blood clot, watercress might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Watercress is LIKELY SAFE in the amounts found in food. Watercress is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts used in medicine, short-term. When it is used long-term or in very large amounts, watercress is POSSIBLY UNSAFE and can cause damage to the stomach. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Watercress is LIKELY UNSAFE when used in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. It might start menstruation and cause a miscarriage. It's best to avoid use. There isn't enough reliable information to know if watercress is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Watercress is LIKELY UNSAFE for use as a medicine in children, especially in those younger than four years old.

Stomach or intestinal ulcers: Don't use watercress if you have stomach or intestinal ulcers.

Kidney disease: Don't use watercress if you have kidney disease.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of watercress depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for watercress. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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