WILLOW BARK

WILLOW BARK
Willow Bark is a natural source of salicin, a compound with anti-inflammatory properties. It is commonly used as a natural pain reliever and may help with conditions such as headaches, back pain, and osteoarthritis.
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Uses & Effectiveness

Overview

Willow bark comes from several varieties of willow tree, including white (Salix alba or European), black (Salix nigra or pussy), crack, and purple willow.

Willow bark contains a chemical called salicin, which is similar to aspirin. It has pain and fever reducing effects in the body.

People commonly use willow bark for back pain, osteoarthritis, fever, flu, muscle pain, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses. There is also no good evidence to support using willow bark for COVID-19.

Willow bark contains a natural chemical compound called salicin, which has pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties. It was the inspiration for the creation of aspirin, one of the most widely used medications in the world.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Willow bark is possibly safe when used for up to 12 weeks. It might cause diarrhea, heartburn, and vomiting in some people. It can also cause itching, rash, and allergic reactions, particularly in people who are allergic to aspirin.

Interactions

    Major Interaction

    Do not take this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with WILLOW BARK

    Willow bark might slow blood clotting. Taking willow bark along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Aspirin interacts with WILLOW BARK

    Willow bark contains chemicals similar to aspirin. Taking willow bark along with aspirin might increase the effects and side effects of aspirin.

  • Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate) interacts with WILLOW BARK

    Willow bark contains chemicals that are similar to choline magnesium trisalicylate. Taking willow bark along with choline magnesium trisalicylate might increase the effects and side effects of choline magnesium trisalicylate.

  • Salsalate (Disalcid) interacts with WILLOW BARK

    Salsalate is a type of medicine called a salicylate. It's similar to aspirin. Willow bark also contains a salicylate similar to aspirin. Taking salsalate along with willow bark might increase the effects and side effects of salsalate.

  • Acetazolamide interacts with WILLOW BARK

    Willow bark contains chemicals that might increase the amount of acetazolamide in the blood. Taking willow bark along with acetazolamide might increase the effects and side effects of acetazolamide.

Special Precautionsand Warnings

When taken by mouth: Willow bark is possibly safe when used for up to 12 weeks. It might cause diarrhea, heartburn, and vomiting in some people. It can also cause itching, rash, and allergic reactions, particularly in people who are allergic to aspirin. Pregnancy: There isn't enough reliable information to know if willow bark is safe to use when pregnant. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Breast-feeding: It is possibly unsafe to use willow bark while breast-feeding. Willow bark contains chemicals that can enter breast milk and have harmful effects on the nursing infant. Don't use it if you are breast-feeding.

Children: Willow bark is possibly unsafe when taken by mouth for viral infections such as colds and flu. There is some concern that, like aspirin, it might increase the risk of developing Reye syndrome. Stay on the safe side and don't use willow bark in children.

Bleeding disorders: Willow bark might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Kidney disease: Willow bark might reduce blood flow through the kidneys. This might lead to kidney failure in some people. If you have kidney disease, don't use willow bark.

Sensitivity to aspirin: People with asthma, stomach ulcers, diabetes, gout, hemophilia, hypoprothrombinemia, or kidney or liver disease might be sensitive to aspirin and also willow bark. Using willow bark might cause serious allergic reactions. Avoid use.

Surgery: Willow bark might slow blood clotting. It could cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using willow bark at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Dosing

Willow bark has most often been used by adults in doses providing 120-240 mg of salicin by mouth daily for up to 6 weeks. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

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