What are the different types of osteoporosis?

Published at 21.09.2018 05:20

А. Primary Osteoporosis

Primary osteoporosis is most common type of this disease. It occurs 4 times more often than secondary osteoporosis.

It is divided into 4 groups:

  1. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (type I).
  2. Senile Osteoporosis (type II).
  3. Juvenile Osteoporosis.
  4. Idiopathic Osteoporosis.

B. Secondary Osteoporosis

Secondary Osteoporosis can be divided into two large groups: osteoporosis caused by a prior disease, for example, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis resulting from the treatment (iatrogenic osteoporosis).

Juvenile osteoporosis refers to rare diseases. It is manifested by generalized osteopenia. Patients often suffer from pain in the back, hips, legs and feet that making it difficult to walk.

Juvenile osteoporosis occurs with the same frequency among boys and girls, occurs before puberty (at about 10-11 years). However, cases of osteoporosis development at an earlier age, as well as at the beginning of the puberty period, have been described in the scientific literature. The diagnosis is made after the exclusion of all types of secondary osteoporosis, various forms of rickets and congenital skeletal disease (brittle bone disease). Disease prognosis in case of juvenile osteoporosis, as a rule, is favorable if spine and thorax deformities are absent.

Idiopathic Osteoporosis is osteoporosis of adult of vague etiology. It is rare, develops in women aged 20-50 years and in men at 25-60 years. Disease in men is observed 2 times more often than in women. Often, the starting factor of osteoporosis in women is pregnancy and lactation, in men – alcohol abuse, smoking, diets with insufficient intake of calcium and decrease in the level of free testosterone. Patients with idiopathic osteoporosis are concerned about moderate back pain, decreased growth. Roentgen diagnostics are diagnosed with osteoporosis of the axial skeleton with possible fractures of the ribs and vertebrae.

Postmenopausal Osteoporosis is associated with an accelerated loss of bone mass in women after ischomenia. The reason for its development is a hunger for estrogens. Against the backdrop of estrogen hunger, the most pronounced changes occur in the cancellous bones. In patients, along with an increase in resorption, the formation of bone tissue also increases, but it can not completely compensate for resorption, which increases the instability of bone trabecular architectonics, which leads to an increased risk of fracture of cancellous bones.

In patients, along with an increase in resorption, the formation of bone tissue also increases, but it can not completely compensate for resorption, which increases the instability of bone trabecular architectonics, which leads to an increased risk of fracture of trabecular bones.

Senile osteoporosis is characterized by loss of both cancellous and cortical bones. The main reasons for the development of senile osteoporosis in people of both sexes are a decrease in calcium intake, impaired absorption of calcium in the intestinal canal and Hypovitaminosis D which can lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism and, as a result, acceleration of bone remodeling. One of the factors contributing to the development of senile osteoporosis is the decrease in physical activity in the elderly.

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